Lighthouse Gang Publishing

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Childrens Books

 

 

 

 

Why am I different
(Book Four)

Amy has always been the quiet and reflective person of her group of friends. However, this day her mother notices she is much more quiet than usual. She asks Amy what is wrong. Amy tells her mother that her friends have not been in school and she had to sit alone at lunch and the kids at the other table called her weird. Her mother tells her to not let the words of others hurt her. She suggests Amy share her experience with her friends when she see them.

The next day Amy shares with her friends what happened the previous day. Her friends decide to talk to the other kids that had called Amy weird. The discussion did not go well. That evening Amy shares the day’s events with her mother and then pauses and asks, “Why do they call us weird?” Her mother response makes her feel better.

The next morning at school Amy is still feeling sad. Her friends decide to develop a plan to get even with the other kids for calling them weird. They decide to meet after school to develop a plan. As Howie walks up to the group they see Taylor is with him. Howie explains that he has been talking to Taylor about their adventures at their favorite place play at the big oak tree. The all look at each other and it is obvious. Why hadn’t they thought about it before, off so they go to the big oak tree.

As they arrive at the big oak tree they see the old man with gray hair and beard. He says he has been waiting for two days for them to come visit. The old man tells them a wonderful story. The kids ask the old man why he was smiling because the story appeared to not have a good ending. The old man continues to smile and relates the lesson he learned that has helped him his entire life. Taylor says, “I think I understand” and she shares with the group. The old man smiles as he skips down the path.

The next day the group decides to talk to the kids that had called them weird. The events that transpire are not what you would expect.

Copyright©2008 Michael Alan Kuhn